Essay Writing Motivation Software

The American journalist Gene Fowler once remarked,

“Writing is easy. All you do is stare at a blank sheet of paper until drops of blood form on your forehead.”

Make no mistake, though – Fowler was totally lying, and writing is really hard. So let’s enlist the help of our robot overlords in order to make it a little easier.

Today I’ll share 15 apps and websites that might help you become a better writer. Some are huge, multi-faceted programs, while others are more single-purpose and can help with organizing research, planning, gaining motivation, or editing.

If you’d like even more resources to help with other aspects of your education, you’ll find even more websites, apps, and tools over at the Resources page.

If you’re unable to see the video above, you can view it on YouTube.

  • Coggle – a free mind-mapping tool that can help you organize ideas.
  • Storyline Creator – a mapping tool that’s built around individual characters and the flow of events in a story.
  • Evernote – my second brain. Pretty much everything I write starts out as a note here. Here’s another article I wrote with additional Evernote tips.
  • Scrivener – a full-fledged application for writing a novel. This is what I finished writing 10 Steps to Earning Awesome Gradeswith.
  • Novlr – a new alternative to Scrivener. It seems like it has a nicer design, but fewer features. I found some recommendations for it on the NaNoWriMo forums.
  • Byword – a minimalist Markdown editor for OS X. You don’t need to know Markdown to use it… but Markdown is really easy to learn.
  • Twinword Writer – a tool with a built-in thesaurus that suggests alternative words when you pause in your writing.
  • Write or Die – an app that will punish you if you don’t keep writing. Punishments can range from annoying noises to “Kamikaze Mode”, which starts erasing your writing!
  • Written? Kitten! – a more positive take on the Write or Die concept; instead of punishing you, it rewards you with pictures of kittens every 100 words.
  • 750words – the name describes it pretty well; this is a site that can help you build a daily writing habit. It’s got pretty cool stat-tracking as well.
  • DailyPage – a site that gives you a different writing prompt (e.g. Write about your favorite leader) every day.
  • Mendeley – I’m not a grad student, but I’d use this if I was. It’s a free tool that can help you manage research documents and PDFs.
  • editMinion – a tool that can analyze your writing and pick out weak and over-used words. It can also tell you if your sentences are too short or long.
  • Coffitivity – plays coffee shop noises to give you a nice working atmosphere – a good alternative to white noise generators.
  • Brain.fm – a web app that uses AI to generate music that’s supposed to help you increase your focus and attention. The site even has research to back up their claims. I’ve tested it a few times, and while I’m not sure if the music is truly working or just providing a placebo effect yet, I will way that it’s pretty darn good music for working.

By the way, if Brain.fm’s style of music isn’t for you, then you might enjoy my Ultimate Study Music Playlist on YouTube. I add new songs to it often.

Lastly, if you haven’t heard it, you might enjoy the CIG podcast episode where I break down how I wrote my 27,000 word book.

Got other recommendations that I didn’t include here? Share them in the comments!

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Automated Essay Evaluation (AEE) systems are being increasingly adopted in the United States to support writing instruction. AEE systems are expected to assist teachers in providing increased higher-level feedback and expediting the feedback process, while supporting gains in students’ writing motivation and writing quality. The current study explored these claims using a quasi-experimental study. Four eighth-grade English Language Arts (ELA) classes were assigned to a combined feedback condition in which they received feedback on their writing from their teacher and from an automated essay evaluation (AEE) system called PEG Writing®. Four other eighth-grade ELA classes were assigned to a teacher feedback-only condition, in which they received feedback from their teacher via GoogleDocs. Results indicated that teachers gave the same median amount feedback to students in both condition, but gave proportionately more feedback on higher-level writing skills to students in the combined PEG + Teacher Feedback condition. Teachers also agreed that PEG assisted them in saving one-third to half the time it took to provide feedback when they were the sole source of feedback (i.e., the GoogleDocs condition). At the conclusion of the study, students in the combined feedback condition demonstrated increases in writing persistence, though there were no differences between groups with regard to final-draft writing quality.

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