To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Justice

To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee An Essay On How Justice And Injustice Is Represented In The Novel

"...in this country our courts are the great levellers, and in our courts all men are created equal." Describe and explain how justice and injustice are represented through events and characters in To Kill a Mockingbird.

Justice, what is right and fair by all of society's standards and morals, is represented, along with injustice, through events and characters in To Kill a Mockingbird. "...in this country our courts are the great levellers, and in our courts all men are created equal." (Atticus, pg227). One type of justice is the legal kind, the kind in our courts, where men are found guilty or innocent. The other is any right or just act. "The one thing that doesn't abide by majority rule is a person's conscience." (Atticus, pg116). In To Kill a Mockingbird these justices and injustices are represented through Atticus, Tom Robinson, Arthur 'Boo' Radley, and through the prejudices of people.

In To Kill a Mockingbird Atticus Finch represents the epitome of justice, through his belief in equality. He has a great belief in the legal system, and a belief that it will be fair and equal to all. "Our courts have their faults, as does any human institution, but in this country our courts are the great levellers, and in our courts all men are created equal. 'I'm no idealist to believe in the integrity of our courts and in the jury system - that is no ideal to me, it is a living, working reality." (Atticus, pgs 226-227). Atticus Finch, a lawyer by profession, has a deep rooted belief that the court system will be just and fair, as that is what it stands for. Atticus is also just in that he is not prejudice; he does not think himself above another man based on skin colour. "'The handful of people in this town who say that fair play is not marked White Only; the handful of people who say a fair trial is for everyone, not just us; the handful of people with enough humility to think, when they look at a negro, there but for the Lord's kindness am I.'" (Miss Maudie, pg261). Miss Maudie shared the same beliefs as Atticus, the belief that everyone is equal. Through Atticus there is also an injustice shown, not in how he treats others, but by how he is treated. "'Mr Cunningham is basically a good man,' he [Atticus] said, 'he just has his blind spots along with the rest of us.' Jem spoke. 'Don't call that a blind spot. He'da killed you last night when he first went there.'" (pg173). Because of his belief that Tom Robinson deserved a fair trial, he was a target for anger, which is an instance of injustice. Atticus shows that treating everyone equally is the right thing to do, and that is justice.

On the other hand, Tom Robinson is a perfect example of injustice. He had a good character, and was a kind-hearted person who got accused, and convicted, of rape because of the basis that he was black. He tried to help Mayella Ewell, but was looked down upon because of this. "'Yes suh. I felt sorry for her, she seemed to try more'n the rest of 'em -'...

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